Boozy Books: Norse Myth

Heyo! Welcome to Boozy Books! I’m going to try to make this one quick because, guys…

IT’S MOVING AGAIN!

OK, I should probably explain before everyone thinks I’ve been suffering from a really bad bout of constipation…

There is a story a friend and I have been working on for going on nine years now. It’s basically Star Wars but we explore the deep nuances in rebellions as opposed to having it be black and white Empire bad, rebels good. Some of our greatest villains are actually people aligned with the rebellion and the Empire keeps people healthy, fed, working, educated, and not worried about crime. Sure, they’re not really free to speak their mind and whatnot, but yeah. OK, and they are still punishing Earth for an earlier rebellion 500 years after it happened… but still, they’re not shooting lightning from their hands. They’re bad, not cartoonish.

Anyway. This story moves in fits and starts. It can go years without a single addition. And this is the case with the last few years. Three, actually.

BUT IT MOVED TODAY! IT MOVED! AND I AM SO EXCITED! I’M SO EXCITED, I DON’T REALLY WANT TO DO THIS POST AND INSTEAD WANT TO READ IT OVER AND OVER AND OVER AND THEN START MY OWN ADDITION!

(For those of you deafened by that screaming… I’m really excited and I want to go work on that instead of this blog, but this blog is a responsibility and I need to do it, so here I am writing this blog.)

This week, I’m giving my official recommendation of Neil Gaiman’s Norse Myth. Not that anyone needs it because OF COURSE this is an amazing book. It’s not Gaiman’s version of the myths we know so well–he doesn’t rewrite them–but the myths we know so well written in Gaiman’s amazing voice. Though they’re written down, they read almost like a verbal recounting, a transcription of a Norse poet’s words. They’re personal, they’re accessible, and they’re funny. Gaiman’s version of the myth where Thor’s hammer gets stolen made me laugh out loud, disturbing my kitten and earning me a sleepy glare. It’s one of my favorite myths overall, and Gaiman handled it as perfectly as I could have hoped. And there’s a great deal of humanity in these gods, which I’ve always thought was appropriate because, if you remember, the Norse gods die. Just like us.

So, what are we drinking? Mead, of course! Because, even though Gaiman’s version of Odin says it takes like piss in American Gods, it’s an important drink. And should be part of all things god.

Read this. I am off to finish this addition and start my own. I’m so excited. GUYS! MUCH EXCITE!

See you Sunday.

C

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